Tag Archives: kung fu

Martial Arts, lonely or friendly…

Newsletter 871

An Interesting Thought Matrix…

Happy every day to you!
The work out you do today will be special.
Gonna really rock.
Now get started!

Got an interesting email the other day,
Michael S. had this nifty way of looking at things…

I was talking to a friend earlier and it got me thinking about a couple of things. I wanted to pass along what I came up with and see what you thought.

Basically, my idea is that techniques have three main categories in relation to each other.

If we say your good friend Joe Blow has a strong jab, you might teach him a cross. Those techniques are friendly, meaning they work together in a very natural way.

Then you teach him a kick so he’ll be able to play that range too. This kick is complementary, meaning it isn’t exactly friendly with the jab but it serves to round Joe out.

Then he goes home and gets on to Youtube and decides to pick up a kimura. He doesn’t know much about grappling, he hasn’t learned any takedowns. The kimura is lonely. A lonely technique is one that needs friends to be really effective and doesn’t have them. If Joe goes down to the local BJJ school and starts learning the basics then that kimura is going to have lots of friends.

It goes without saying that this isn’t some kind of weird dig at BJJ (I know you’ll pick that up but I want to add some clarity in case this email gets shared). If a dedicated Judoka picks up a superman punch one day, then it’s the same situation. He’ll have to develop his striking base before that punch gets to ever really be effective.

One other thing I’d like to clear up about this paradigm is that some techniques can be alone but not necessarily lonely. These will tend to be straightforward basic techniques. As a matter of course, the techniques most likely to be lonely are advanced or complex moves when someone does not have a good grasp of the basics.

And of course, have a great workout.

I like the idea of grouping techniques
as friendly and lonely.
It makes science more user friendly.

Thanks Michael.

Okay,
thanks for all the orders for the
Professional Martial Arts Instructor.

Remember, if you are out of states,
meaning foreign or even Canada,
you need to order the PDF.
Postage out of the 48 kills me.

And,
here’s an interesting little phenomena…
Paypal insists on charging shipping for PDFs.
I have talked myself blue in the face,
but they make no sense.

Here’s their insanity.
I put 0 in the shipping and handling box.
They charge $4.
I complain,
they say I have to change ALL my buttons
to fix one.
What?
Are they crazy?
Why doesn’t $0 work?
They just keep repeating their insanity.
It’s a variation of
saying the same thing and hoping for a different answer.

So,
people are getting charged $4 extra on PDF orders.
Regular book is okay,
I’ve shifted to Amazon for that.
But,
I am now trying different things for the PDF,
and may be looking for a different company.
The problem is I would have to start on changing
hundreds of buttons.
Grrr.

So,
my apology.
I will try charging one penny,
if that doesn’t work,
I will try something else.

Just thought i’d let you know what is going on.

And,
I’m working on book two of the series.
Give me a month,
should have something big and great coming along.

Okay,
for those willing to confront
the PayPal insanity, (grin)
here’s the link

http://www.martialartsinstructortraining.com

Again, thanks Michael,
and thanks to everybody for helping me.

Have a great work out!

Al

http://www.martialartsinstructortraining.com

http://www.amazon.com/Binary-Matrixing-Martial-Arts-Case/dp/1515149501/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1437625109&sr=8-1&keywords=binary+matrixing

go to and subscribe to this newsletter:

https://alcase.wordpress.com

Remember,

Google doesn’t like newsletters,

so this is the best way to ensure you get them.

You can find all my books here!

http://monstermartialarts.com/martial-arts/

http://www.amazon.com/Matrixing-Tong-Bei-Internal-Gung/dp/1507869290/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1423678613&sr=8-1&keywords=tong+bei

The Secret of the One Year Black Belt Re-issued!

Outlaw Karate Gets a Face Lift!

‘Outlaw Karate: The Secret of the One Year Black Belt,’ was one of the first books on Matrixing. Actually, it was written before matrixing became ‘officialize.’

This is the first book to put forth the concept that people could actually earn a real Black Belt in Karate in a year of less.

This new edition includes a glossy cover. The original material,  five star rated on Amazon, is intact.

The glory of this book is that it goes belt by belt, describing all the experiences, detailing what the student should be going through, and showing all the forms and applications. Thus, the reader has a much better chance of getting through the material without error; it is actually possible to get to a Black Belt within one year.

The book is based on the author’s synthesis of two martial arts, ‘Kang Duk Won’ and ‘Kwon Bup.’ All duplicate material has been discarded, along with fluff material such as poser techniques, unworkable techniques, and so on.

The result is an extremely hard core, street workable system.

The book includes detailed instructions on such items as:

  • how to create power
  • six ways to translate a block into totally different techniques
  • promotional requirements for every belt
  • what a student goes through on each belt level and why
  • the actual written tests for each belt
  • and TONS more.

The book is 166 pages with 212 images. In includes the complete system, with all the forms, applications, and methods of freestyle.

To find out more about Outlaw Karate: The Secret of the One Year Black Belt, click on this cover…

you can get a black belt in less than a year

Click on the cover to go to Amazon and find out more…

This book is a complete system. It includes all the forms and form applications, along with methods of freestyle.

Gordon Liu and the Mad Monkey Punch!

Newsletter 860

Gordon Liu, Cal Worthington, and the Most Powerful Punch in ALL the Martial Arts

Let’s talk about perfection in your work outs.

I’m pretty lucky.

I grew up through the so called 

golden age of martial arts.

Though,

truth,

I think the golden age is just over the hill,

we’re on the cusp of great things,

things that the ancient masters would eat their hearts out for.

So,

in this golden age of martial arts

were some wild ass chop sockies.

Chop sockies are the name we’ve given kung movies

of the seventies and eighties.

Special effects consisted of trampoline kicks,

and the most terrible acting imaginable.

But for a country that had no martial arts

this was the holy grail.

Gordon Liu was the ringleader 

of this massive influx of kung fu.

‘Thirty-six Chambers of Death,’

you know?

And,

one night I was watching late TV.

During the eighties

late night was supported by Cal Worthington.

Stick with me now,
I’m going to take a little trip…

Cal Worthington sold cars on late night TV.

He would put a tiger on the hood of a car

and call it his dog ‘spot.’

One day I needed to buy a car,

so I headed over to Cal Worthington’s place,

kids and wife in tow.

Now Cal had a song that played on TV.

The song went…

‘Go see Cal, Go see Cal, Go see Cal!’

And I didn’t know that my two boys couldn’t understand the song,

and had replaced Cal’s lyrics with their own.

So we hoped out of the car

a bunch of sales men were leaning against a nearby car,

and one of my boys went up to them

and asked if this was really where Cal Worthington  lived.

The salesman smiled and said yes.

My boys immediately launched into their own version of the Cal song.

‘Pussy Cal, Pussy Cal, Pussy Cal!

Needless to say,

the salesman were lying on the ground and holding their guts.

They couldn’t stop laughing.

I tried to get one to stop laughing.

I said, ‘We need a car.’

Between laughs he said, ‘I don’t care!’

And the laughter started up again.

Okay,

that was a long way to go,

but here’s the thing,

amongst those bad, old movies that Cal supported

was a little gem called, ‘Mad Monkey Kung Fu.’

At three in the morning,

one summer night,

I was watching that thing,

and the hero gets his ass kicked,

and he is training in this weird stuff called Monkey Kung Fu,

and suddenly I see the training gimmick.

He hits with his outstretched fingers,

then, without retracting his hand,

he goes forward with his knuckles,

then, without retracting his hand,

he goes forward with his fist.

I looked at that.

I started going around the house,

hitting walls, doors, anything that was a surface.

Fingers, knuckles, fist…

Fingers, knuckles, fist…

Fingers, knuckles, fist…

And,

I knew it was a movie gimmick.

I knew it was bogus,

but I couldn’t stop practicing it.

Fingers, knuckles, fist…

And,

over the course of months

I tweaked that sucker into different forms,

explored different timings,

and things started to happen.

When I began kenpo,

back in 1967,

I used to hang a piece of cardboard,

and strike it with a backfist.

Eventually,

I was able to make hole on the cardboard,
but I stopped because there was no place to go.
I make a hole and…so what?

What was the next step?

Then,
years later,
I found the Mad Monkey Punch,

and this obsession gripped me again,

‘and over the months I began to put holes in things.
cardboard,
pieces of drywall,
whatever.

Now,

everything is connected in this universe.

somebody touches your little toe,

and even the hairs on your head feel it.

When I started practicing the Mad Monkey Punch

I was already at the point
where I could make holes in cardboard with a backlist,

and I could do push ups on two straight fingers.

And, I had done  a ton of Tai Chi,

Tai where I shifted the body back and forth,

causing weight to go back and forth,

causing a feeling of energy going back and forth,

like water in a  bathtub,

as it were,

and I suddenly began putting that into a fist.

Here is the equation:
Kenpo snapping backfist.

Push ups on two perfectly straight fingers.

The Mad Monkey Punch.

Tai Chi sloshing around inside my karate body.

equals

a fist that can penetrate the body.

There are three depths when striking,

strike the skin,

hitting as hard as you can,

but leaving no pain.

strike the muscle,

causing bruise.

strike the bone

causing the bones to shiver and break.

I sometimes am teaching people,

and when I want to make a point,

I strike for the bone.

The students INSTANTLY crumple up.

They jump back and rub their shoulder,

and wonder how the heck an old man can hit so hard.

I don’t hit so that the body is flung back,

in fact,

I hit and the body doesn’t go anywhere,

it is just revulsed from the introduction of total body invalidation,
invalidation that the student can feel
from the little toe
to the hairs on his head..

Sometimes you can see me do this kind of punch on videos,

but not often.

I’ll have to shoot a video on it,
showcase it for you.

it really is easy,

but it took a long time to develop,

especially since I didn’t know what I was doing.

And I really didn’t know what I was doing,

but it was like I was caught in a current,

and bouncing off significant rocks,

until an idea or two formed in my head.

Connections.

Everything in the universe is totally connected,

but it takes awareness to see it.

The martial arts grow that awareness,

but you have to have patience,

and a wee bit of faith.

Anyway,

I hope I have inspired a few of you

to explore some of these things,

snapping backfists
totally straight two finger push ups,

mad monkey punches

tai chi until you are sloshing bathtub of energy.

Or maybe something I’ve said

has connected with something you already know,

or caused a spark to happen,

or something.

You know,

if you wish to know what I know,

to tap into my 50 years of martial arts obsessing,

it’s all in the videos and books.

Try this one…

http://monstermartialarts.com/martial-arts/hard-punch/

That’s a book written on punching.

A whole book,

listing ALL the exact methods I used,

how I figured out the sequence of energies,

to make a perfect punch,

and the exact drills I did.

Actually,

there’s three books bundled here,

read about the other two at the bottom of this page.

http://monstermartialarts.com/martial-arts/hard-punch/

Thanks for being martial artists,

and have a great work out!

Al

http://monstermartialarts.com/martial-arts/hard-punch/

http://www.amazon.com/Binary-Matrixing-Martial-Arts-Case/dp/1515149501/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1437625109&sr=8-1&keywords=binary+matrixing

go to and subscribe to this newsletter:

https://alcase.wordpress.com

Remember,

Google doesn’t like newsletters,

so this is the best way to ensure you get them.

You can find all my books here!

http://monstermartialarts.com/martial-arts/

http://www.amazon.com/Matrixing-Tong-Bei-Internal-Gung/dp/1507869290/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1423678613&sr=8-1&keywords=tong+bei

Winning Martial Arts!

Newsletter 803
Make Your Day with a Martial Arts Win!

Great Afternoon!

I was teaching this morning,
and it is almost impossible to describe
how wonderful one feels
after sharing the martial arts.

Sharp,
quick,
strong,
happy.

Hey,
I thought I’d share a win.
I get wins all the time,
and if I’m a little busy,
so what…
I can still share a win,
right?

Before I do,
however,
google is figuring out
how to send newsletters into Spam folders.
So put me in your contacts,
or just go to
https://alcase.wordpress.com
and sign up.
The newsletters always end up there.

Now,
here comes a win from Jason W.

I’ve trained on two continents officially hold 1 black belt, and unofficially am that level in 2 others. I am currently working through the purple belt level in your Kang Duk Won course. I have to say that the workout is as tough as anything I did in Hapkido, but I am slowly getting there. The KDW material is filling in all the holes I had in my training. It’s really amazing how much stuff the instructors leave out or don’t even know. About a year ago I was at the place where you started in developing matrixing. I was looking for ways to bridge all my training into a logical system apart from the individual styles. I am lucky I found your site. I saved myself about 40 years of headaches! Just keep up the good work.

Thanks, Jason.
I appreciate kind words,
I love your win.

Jason is doing the course at
KangDukWon.com.

I wrote it in attempt
to keep alive all the material
I learned at the original Kang Duk Won.

So,
have a win,
and share the arts,
and if you have a win,
send it in.

If you want to beat the blues,
read the wins.

Okley donkley,

you guys have a GREAT work out,
and I’ll talk to you later.

Al

KangDukWon.com

And don’t forget to sign up for the newsletter at
https://alcase.wordpress.com

http://www.amazon.com/Matrixing-Tong-Bei-Internal-Gung/dp/1507869290/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1423678613&sr=8-1&keywords=tong+bei

Karate Kata…How Good Are They?

Martial Arts Kata, Good or Bad?

in the Martial Arts Kata are often translated as martial arts forms, so I use the terms interchangeably.

Bruce Lee said in “The Tao of Jeet Kune Do” the following about forms:

“Too much horsing around with unrealistic stances and classic forms and rituals is just too artificial and mechanical, and doesn’t really prepare the student for actual combat.”

martial arts karate kataIs this true? Or is it meaningful, do forms actually teach you combat? Certainly looking at Pinan/Heian 1, or Kenpo Long 1, you have to wonder, is this meaningful? Are they honestly expecting me to drop the opposite hand when I block and punch?  And why are they having me drop my hands when in sparring they tell me to keep my hands up?

Even with something so entrenched as Sanchin, or the Sil Lum Tao those that lack correct teaching have to wonder, “how is this teaching me to fight?”.

In stark contrast are kata such as sanseirui, where it is very apparent that the kata is truly a combat scenario that captured and formalized into a form. This is evidenced by the lack of symmetry in the form, you don’t have “do the exact same thing on the other side” or “first do it on the right, then on the left”.

But do any of them provide you with anything useful? Or do they lock you into a routine.

Bruce was an incredible man, certainly what he said must have some value.  Besides, if not for forms, how do we transmit the style, untarnished, to the next generation?

The problem with Bruce, is that he was amazing. He was so amazing that somewhere along the line he seems to have forgotten that you have to explain to a new student how to make a fist, not to punch with the flat part of your fist, to line up the bones, to add CBM.  We can see that he knew this, for he said (paraphrasing here) “before I learned to punch, a punch was just a punch, while I was learning, a punch was much more than a punch.  Now, a punch is just a punch”.  However, he repeatedly wanted to throw away all the tools that are used to learn basics.

To quote my sensei, “you have to have a set of basics before you start learning to break free of the forms”.

I feel that all forms are intended to serve a purpose, but what is that purpose?

Let us start with the so simple that they are obnoxious forms, like the early Kenpo forms and the Pinans.  They are not meant to be combat forms, they are meant to be a way to train symmetry, and to familiarize you with the “alphabet of movement” that your system trains.  Think of the movements in these forms as “this is my footwork, these are my blocks, these are my strikes,  there are many like them, but these are mine”.  Symmetry is important, you need to be able to block, thrust, flick, parry and strike on both sides, these forms teach you exactly that, and they force you to practice equally on both sides.  Bruce may have been so good that he only needed five techniques and only those on his lead side, but that doesn’t account for most people, nor does it address what you are supposed to do if you get injured during combat.

So basic, boring forms have a purpose, even if it is only training.  However, when we go back to the question of dropping the hand, you do have to stop and wonder why practice something that we would never want to do in combat.   This is where I personally feel that some of these forms are less valuable than they could be.

Sanchin appears to be one of these boring beginner forms; however, it is an exceptional kata, Please see the earlier article I wrote on Sanchin (add a link to the other blog post).  My sensei was fond of saying that he could tell your belt level by watching your performance of Sanchin.

The Sil lum tao, is also a form that appears to be on the boring scale, however, it is a very internal form. It is meant to isolate the hand movements used in Wing Chun so they can be practiced separately from any foot movement, and to build Chi power.  These 2 aspects mean that it can be practiced and improved on for the rest of your life, just like Sanchin.

None of the seemingly boring kata teach you to fight, not even sanchin.  They may teach you many critical elements of fighting, blocks and strikes that you can combine, a clear calm mind, the ability to take a hit and continue. These things and more can be learned from kata.

Learning to fight from a kata though?  That is tough, there are people that have been reputed to have done so, I have a very hard time believing that.

In my mind the only way to improve reflexes, and learn to handle unexpected things is to get into sparring (at all contact levels) with as many different people as possible.  Try to get with people of different levels, different arts, and no arts.

In my personal opinion, I feel kata are very important, both for handing down the style, uncompromised. They are critical for training your body to use all the different tools in the styles toolbox.

I do not feel that they are a prison, rather an encyclopedia of motion and much more.  In my mind all kata should give you as many tools as Sanchin, Sil lum tao and Sanseirui.   However, if the form teaches you to do dangerous things, like drop your hands, you might want to re-evaluate the validity of that particular form.

If you want to align and make logical your Martial Arts Kata, check out the Master Instructor Course at MonsterMartialArts.com.

Tai Chi Chuan Totally Broken Down with Western Logic

Matrix Tai Chi Chuan

Speaking of Tai Chi Chuan,
I have just released Matrix Tai Chi Chaun.

ancient tai chi

Learning Tai Chi Chuan with western logic ~ click on image above!

I actually released this some years ago,
but I stopped selling it.
The reason
I was not happy with the book.
So,
being on a mountaintop
head above the clouds,
I was able to see what I had done and not done,
and I was able to write
one of the best matrixing books I have ever written!

Matrixing a posture
matrixing the postures
how to matrixing the techniques so you get 50 plus applications
matrixing the footwork so you get 25+ silk reeling exercises!
Two matrixes,
one for hard tai chi applications,
and the information so you can change that into hard and soft applications!

And here is something you’re really going to like…
I always talk about the blank spots one finds by using a matrix,
how you can find out the data that was hidden,
glossed over,
made mysterious,
forgotten…
In Matrix Tai Chi I really show how this happens,
and how I compare two matrixes to find all sorts of stuff!

And here’s something you should know…
Matrix TCC is based on this principle…
A beginner learns hard applications
an intermediate learns hard/soft applications
An expert learns soft applications.

Do you understand?
All the TCC boys and girls out there are pushing soft apps,
expecting people to jump from the floor to the roof!
They are missing the basic and intermediate steps!
No wonder TCC can get so messy and misunderstood!

In Matrix TCC you get all three steps.

You’re going to be able to do hard TCC within a couple of weeks,
and then start working on the hard/soft apps for a couple of months,
and then you’ll be capable of the REAL Tai Chi Chuan!

Now,
a couple of things.

If you ordered the old Matrix TCC,
and there was only a couple of you,
send me the third page of the matrix TCC book I sold you,
and I will send you the new Matrix TCC book.

The video is the same,
no need to replace that.
It is me and Nehemiah going through
the lines, applications, footworks, form and freestyles.

So if you ordered before,
you get the book for free.
Just follow the instructions above.

Now,
what is the difference between Matrix TCC and Five Army TCC,
a little and a lot.

Matrix TCC breaks it all down.
You even get a quick breakdown of the form.

But,
it is not as in depth and comprehensive
as my breakdown of the form and applications of the form
on Five Army TCC.

It’s a matter of time,
and how much I could pack on the course.

Matrix TCC has matrixing,
breaks TCC down like it has NEVER been broken down before.

Five Army TCC I go into the form in depth and detail,
so if you like what I am saying and doing on Matrix TCC,
then you are going to want to get the finer detailed analysis.

So you can now get Matrix TCC by itself,
or you can get the package of both Matrix and Five Army TCC,
and save a few bucks.

Here’s the link for Matrix TCC..

http://monstermartialarts.com/martial-arts/2ba-matrix-tai-chi-chuan/

And here’s the link for the TCC package…

http://monstermartialarts.com/martial-arts/tai-chi-chuan-package/

I haven’t had time to expand the larger Kung Fu package
but I will int he future.
If anybody is interested in that, let me know.

Anyway,
Matrix TCC is one CD and two DVDs,
Five Army TCC is four DVDs
Together, that’s about one CD and six DVDs
or a book and almost FIVE HOURS hours
of a new logic
presented one on one
in a very hands on format
so you can’t not understand!

AND YOU SHOULD KNOW
I always recommend the instant download,
because being on a mountaintop
I don’t get to the post office every day.

The videos are on youtube
and it is the simplest thing in the world
to find software to download videos from youtube for free.

If ever a disk or download doesn’t work
just let me know at aganzul@gmail.com
and I will see to fixing it as quickly as I can.

Now,
that’s about it.
I’ve been working hard on this,
didn’t even put out a newsletter last Friday,
but…this is the gold.
This course,
and especially the book
really puts the cap on Matrixing.
All the way from hard to soft,
so you can understand EVERYTHING,
and even turn around and teach it.

And in the shortest possible time.

Think about it,
people spend a couple of decades
to get what I’ve put together,
and then what they’ve got is slanted towards one art,
spotty,
messy,
filled with illogic and blank spots.
And you can get ALL the martial arts,
understand EVERYTHING
and within a couple of years.
Three or four months for each Matrixing course,
and you get DECADES of knowledge
without the mistakes and missteps.

So,
if you’ve just been reading this newsletter
it’s time to get your stuff in gear,
it’s not just…’be all you can be.’
It’s…’become more than anybody imagined!’

And if you’re ready for Matrix TCC,
the gloves are off!
Come and get it!

Don’t just have a great workout…
Have yourself a most spectacular journey!

Al

http://monstermartialarts.com/martial-arts/2ba-matrix-tai-chi-chuan/

Martial Arts Testing and Belts and Rank and All that Stuff…

The Truth About Martial arts Testing and Fees!

I recently came across the most interesting discussion concerning Martial Arts testing for belts. It was interesting because it was well thought out, concerned, and because I disagreed with most of what was said.

Sometimes I will make a comment, but in this case I am prompted to tell the truth about Martial Arts testing. What makes this particularly juicy is that the people involved in this discussion were nibbling at the edges of what I did a lo-o-ong time ago, and which is more in keeping with the true spirit of the martial arts.

real fighting

Is Karate the answer to this type of attack?



Originally there were no belts, which doesn’t mean there were no ranks.

Gichin Funakoshi introduced belts which, I believe, came from the a method used by swimming teams.

The first two belt ranks were white and black. This expanded to white, green, brown and black.

Some fifty years ago ranks and belts exploded. Ed Parker and Kenpo Karate led the way with a rainbow of colors. Taekwondo expanded the colors even further.

Now, this is the way it happened, but, there is an incredibly valuable piece of data missing.

I began studies with Kenpo, and was introduced to the belt system, and found it valuable in encouraging people to study.

Isn’t it interesting that people have to be encouraged to study?

But, when I went to the Kang Duk Won, I wasn’t encouraged to study. We had four basic belts, white, green, brown and black, further delineated by stripes, and nobody much cared.

Simply, people who cared about flashy belts left the school, and only the faithful, the ones who didn’t need to be encouraged to study, were left.

Nowadays people treat the martial arts like a business, structure everything around sales and promotion, and the belt is held up as the goal.

Fact: the belt means nothing.

Fact: knowledge means everything.

But these two facts seem to have become twisted, and the belt means everything, and knowledge means nothing.

I didn’t understand my Kang Duk Won instructors thoughts concerning belts, and I didn’t care. I was one of the faithful. I worked out till I bled, and there was no middle ground. There was no entertainment, and freestyle while recognized as a game, was treated like life or death.

Not to beat somebody else up, but to hone your own skills.

Interestingly, this type of freestyle brought one to mushin no shin (mind of no mind), which is an intuitive method, and it was a science, and it was TOTALLY combat effective. When people say their art is not combative effective, or not useful on the street, I know they didn’t study the real art, but rather an art that entertains children.

When I became an instructor I awarded rank according to forms and techniques learned.

As I progressed I realized the inadequacy of that, and I stopped giving out belts. For years I gave no martial arts tests, simply gave a person a black belt when he had the knowledge.

This thing of knowledge is quite interesting.

The number of forms learned, of techniques done, has no relationship to martial arts knowledge.

And I could ascertain the depth of knowledge a person had by simply looking at him.

Just to mention a couple of the actual criteria:
how deeply does a person ‘screw’ himself into the ground when doing his forms and techniques.
Or, what level of intuition has the student progressed to.

And there are other criteria, all coming from the removal of the student from his body.

I know, sounds crazy, but the awareness that is a human being becomes removed from his body through the method of doing the martial arts forms and techniques correctly.

Emphasis on ‘correctly,’ as it requires an experience of physics beyond the normal ‘fist in the face’ ‘apple falls on the head’ physics. This is an entirely different set of physics which I have seen only a few dozen people demonstrate, and none of whom actually understood.

Now, fees. I charge little, if at all. The rationale here is: how can I charge somebody for what he already knows? What he already paid for, and not just in money, but in sweat and blood?

Yet I had one fellow come to me and said he was required to pay $800, plus plane fare to Japan, plus lodgings and meals and all, to take a martial arts test.

For what?

Three old guys would sit behind a table and watch him demonstrate for an hour, then pass or fail with NO comment on why he was passing or failing!

Obviously, these guys loved themselves…and wanted his money. And they called themselves masters.

Anyway, as time went on I got back into giving not belts, but checklists, and then I would just work people to the bone, making sure they screwed themselves into the ground during form and technique, that they reached intuitive levels of freestyle, and other things.

And, eventually, I made these checklists public, selling them as courses, and here an interesting thing happened. Knowledge became able to be transcribed on paper.

Yes, the student still has to work, and those students in it for the entertainment or the belt and so on will have problems.

But a student who actually reads the courses, does the courses, gets the knowledge.

And they usually stop needing to be entertained and become the faithful.

This became an immense and tremendous boon to ANYBODY who possesses these courses.

It eliminated guesswork. It gave workable knowledge.

It enabled the true art to be passed on even if the instructor didn’t have all the knowledge, as it passed on the knowledge to all involved.

Then I come across discussions on how to test.

Man, there are hundreds of theories out there, but all passed on being able to monkey see monkey do a form, and none having to do with the perception of knowledge, of how to actually increase the students awareness.

So I say this: stop entertaining. Get brutal. Search for knowledge and not belts. Award rank for knowledge and not memorized skits.

This is the only way to the true art, and it is the way martial arts testing should be.

Here is a page that will tell you how to find out your true rank without Martial Arts testing.