Tag Archives: karate

How Karate Becomes Every Other Martial Art

Newsletter 939

Translating Karate into Everything

Hey Guys and Gals!
I just wrote the following newsletter,
and I just wanted to say thanks to you guys,
for being martial artists,
and making my path so worthwhile.
Hope you enjoy…

I was a black belt in Karate when I started Aikido.
I always remember the shock on the Aikido black belt’s faces,
I had a question
and I would walk right up
and ask the question.
If you’ve ever been around the classical,
that’s not how you do stuff.
You bow and scrape.
You practice speaking in a subdued manner.
You treat yourself like a humble dope
so they will take pity on you.
But I was a black belt in karate,
I was equal,
be it in another system,
so I would walk up and break the etiquette,
I would just ask.
Funny thing,
they always answered my questions.
I suppose they couldn’t figure out how to say no,
without themselves looking like a doofus.
So one day I’m asking a question,
and this black belt blinks,
and realizes.
‘You’re a black belt.’
Yup.
Then he took me aside,
we traded stuff madly,
really got into the art.
But here’s the interesting thing:
in Karate,
when you get to black belt,
you start figuring out how to use specific forms in freestyle.
Sure.
You’re intuitive,
you start reading minds,
guy thinks about an attack,
you think about a defense from a form,
and they match.
Not like today when people just fight.
Now,
at black belt I wasn’t interested in that.
Did it,
but wasn’t interested.
I was already reading everything,
looking at other arts,
and I wanted to make other arts work.
Of course,
the big problem was that I hadn’t really studied other arts.
I had read about them.
Big problem.
So doing the Aikido class,
I began to realize that I was performing the same body motions,
but going with the opponent
instead of against.
Instead of colliding with an inward block,
if I did a quick step and made the in block go with the attack,
I had aikido.
Zingo Bingo!
Then I looked at Tai Chi,
figured out the concepts,
applied them to Karate motions,
and I was doing Tai Chi.
And,
yes,
it was that simple.
Everything translated if you understood the concept behind the art.
Went through a few Kung Fu systems.
Did weapons,
and so on.
Matrixing was born,
and I wrote a million words
to describe everything
so everybody could understand it.
Do you study one system?
Silly you.
With a few tweaks you could be studying all the martial arts.
Now,
there are a few things to look out for.

First,
most systems these days
have become so muddied
they don’t have specific concepts.

Second,
most systems don’t have the right blend of forms and freestyle,
they end up with two arts…
the art of whatever their forms are
and the art of freestyle.

Third
most systems don’t stick to the path long enough
to become intuitive.
They end up putting boxing into their training,
mixing in MMA so they can advertise,
and so on.
You can recognize these systems
because people describe by using such terms as /muscle memory.’
Muscle memory is what you have until you go intuitive,
then it’s a whole new ballgame.
Then you are in the now.
And that’s a very zen thing.

The thing is,
when you have a system that works,
you can’t go hunting and pecking through other systems,
you have to do your whole system,
then you have to understand the concepts of the other system,
and you have to understand how these concepts work by physics and mechanics.
Then you have to work your butt off.

When I was figuring this stuff out
I was working out several hours a day,
even if I had no partner.
I would do air forms,
pound the bag,
work with weapons,
and write everything I did down.
And,
therein lies the difference
between a martial artist,
and a fellow who practices the martial arts.
We all start out the same,
going to classes,
blindly groping.
The fellow who practices martial arts,
however,
stops.
The martial artist doesn’t stop.
He becomes more and more obsessive,
finding new things to obsess about,
compelled to learn new things,
always dissatisfied with his progress,
always knowing that the truth is right around the corner,
if he could just see…a…little…further.
Anyway,
that’s the path from Karate to Aikido to everything else.
It’s not an easy path,
if you measure it in bruises and hours,
but it is the easiest path if you are obsessed.
Here’s to you,
I hope you’re obsessed.

Have a great work out!

Al

http://monstermartialarts.com/martial-arts/matrix-aikido/

AN AIKIDO WIN!

Here’s a fellow who illustrates what I’ve been saying…

Hi,
Just wanted to take the time to thank you.  Having now watched and read through the Matrix Karate system it is exactly what I was hoping it would be when I originally made the purchase.  I have begun working my way through the material and am enjoying every second of it!  I have since also bought (I’ve been treating myself each pay day) your monkey boxing and within the last few days your Aikido course.  Both I have found instantly applicable, and although I have only watched the Aikido seminar once so far, I have quickly identified that together they are so much more than the sum of their parts!   Within just a few days of the monkey boxing course arriving, I found that I was suddenly able to lock and manipulate to restrain far higher grades than myself in the club I attend, and now have found I have members of all levels, and even my own instructor asking me to just go over techniques so they can see what I did.  Suffice to say that the guy (every club has one) that is like an immovable object was lying face down the very first time I tried a technique you had discussed… and I see no reason why my skills won’t take on a similar bound forward as I absorb the Aikido course.  ?I am sure you hear such stories all the time from people like me (over enthused with what must seem mundane to yourself) but I really felt I ought to say thank you.  One thing I am not sure if other people have found, but I want to mention, I truly appreciate you laying ‘it all’ out for people, by which I mean I appreciate the reward  (in terms of knowledge) coming from hard work and ‘flight time’ rather than an arbitrary period between Dan Gradings no matter how often one trains in that time before the next chunk of knowledge is passed on.  I will continue to follow your courses and let each build on what went before.
One more thanks for the recommendation to read ‘As a man Thinketh’ I really took a lot from it.
Anyhow, I’ll leave you be, and stop pestering you with my ramblings.
Many thanks one last time,
Adam D.

Martial Arts Work Outs That Change You!

Newsletter 935

Why Do a Martial Arts Work Out?

Good and HOT day to you!
It’s over a 100 here in so cal,
And PERFECT for working out!

Hey,
Can I get in your face for a moment?
How much do you work out?
The whole purpose of this newsletter
is to encourage the work out.
So how much do you work out?

To me,
A work out is like a prayer.
I work out EVERY day.
Rain or shine,
Hot or cold,
In good health or poor.
Heck,
Because of working out I’m 70,
and feel like a 25 year old.
I think that makes it all pretty important.

When I work out I get in touch with me.
My thoughts are clearer all day,
Bushwah that bugs me
Suddenly recedes,
Becomes unimportant.
Problems become easy.
People who are difficult suddenly become…easy.
So how much do you work out?

Let me tell you something…
When I was working for my black belt
All those years ago,
I didn’t work out as much as I should.
I just worked out at the school,
Thought that was the only place to work out.
Boy,
Was I dumb.
Then,
Over the years,
I became aware of how much martial arts was doing for me.
I began obsessing.
Reading everything,
Studying everything,
Working out until the wee hours.
But,
You know,
I always have this little niggle inside.
I had wasted time.
I had not worked out obsessively back in the beginning.
I had only worked out at the school.
What wasted opportunities.
When I was fresh and full of vim and vigor,
I relaxed.
I wasted.
What a dope.

So that’s the message of this newsletter,
Now and always…

WORK OUT!
Agree with me or not,
Disagree or not,
The fact is that this is a reminder.
Nothing more,
Nothing less.

Here’s a recent win to encourage you.

Al,

I have gone through many of your courses and am currently going through blinding steel and eventually on my way to forty monkeys. I recently went through your book Matrixing Tong Bei. Several things clicked and the martial arts universe opened up after finishing that book.
Respectfully,
Tyler K

Come on,
Guys and gals,
Work out and make the universe open up for you!

Have a great work out!

Al

Here;S the Blinding Steel course, in it you learn how to matrix ALL weapons!

http://monstermartialarts.com/martial-arts/3a-blinding-steel-matrixing-weapons/

To Be a Truly Unique Martial Artist…

Newsletter 934

Outside the Martial Arts Box!

I used to ask my instructor
what he did to get better.
What did he work on?
What were his training methods?
He answered me:
‘I just do the forms.’
But he could stick his index finger
through a board and leave a hole.
Obviously,
there had to be something more.
It took me a while,
but I figured out the ‘extra ingredient.’
Going outside the box.

For instance,
I’ve written about his kicking bag.
We couldn’t go to a store and buy a bag back then,
we had to make our own.
I bought a duffle bag,
packed it with sawdust,
used it for a while.
It was a true piece of…stuff.
But it worked,
and I practiced,
and my kicks got better.
He did the same thing,
sort of.
He was able to find the canvas ‘sleeves.
He filled it with sawdust,
and the thing was too light,
didn’t pack right,
fell out of shape after a few hundred kicks.
So he experimented,
going ‘outside the box,’
and packed it with sawdust and water.
It got moldy.
He tried adding bleach.
Got soggy,
and he tried other methods.
His stroke of
outside the box
genius?
He cut newspapers in circles,
and stacked the circles in the bag.
Rock hard,
never fell out of shape,
light enough to hang without bending the rafters,
and so on.
This is true ‘out of the box’ thinking.
He did something totally unique,
nobody had EVER done anything like this,
and likely haven’t since then.
But his kicks were truly…
outside the box.

So,
let me describe the trap you are currently in,
which stops you from thinking outside the box.
I came across a fellow on the net,
and he was talking about if bags get too hard
you can’t kick them.
And he’s going into the physics,
and how it is physically impossible
according to the rules of the universe,
and so on.
If my instructor had ever paid attention to the physics…
he never would have made that bag.
He would have been trapped by,
not the physics,
but the belief system surrounding physics.

I was once told that a bumble bee can’t fly.
His weight is too much,
his wings too stubby,
according to physics,
the bumble bee can’t fly.
Thank god the bumble bee doesn’t know physics.
Thank god the bumblebee has his own belief system.

And we get all these athletes
training by physics,
eating the food,
using the training devices,
following regimens described by people
who know physics.

Before the four minute mile was cracked,
it was considered impossible.
No human could ever do that.
Now,
on the top tier of runners,
you’re sort of a wannabe
if you can’t break the four minute mile.
But the physics didn’t change.
What changed was people’s belief in physics.
Or,
they didn’t accept the physics,
and they went ahead and broke the rules.
Went outside the box.
Did something that nobody believed they could do,
just because,
in their supreme moment of ignorance,
they believed in themselves,
and ignored the idiots.
They went outside the box.

When my instructor kicked that bag,
it was too hard,
he should have broken his foot.
But,
he figured out how to kick the bag a little,
and his foot got stronger,
but more important,
his belief that he COULD kick that bag got stronger.
And,
as he kept kicking that bag,
his kicks slowly improved,
and his belief system,
his idea of what it was possible for him to do,
changed.

So that is how you go outside the box.
You get an idea,
you chip away at it,
you look at it,
and you expand your belief system
beyond the belief system
of those that are trapped by belief systems.

Now,
you don’t have a unique idea?
Yes,
you do.
When the instructor has you do ten kicks in class,
do eleven.
Go home and do a hundred.
I noticed that the fellows in my school
who had the best kicks,
were practicing 200 kicks per kick per side.
So I went home and started practicing
250 kicks per kick per side.
And,
man,
am I glad I did.
I’m 70 now,
and when I practice with these young kids,
my front kick is still faster,
and they really don’t like blocking it,
it hurts them to block it.

And,
what about forms?
Do you do your forms twice or thrice
and then call it?
How about doing your forms ten times?
Or,
have you ever done a form100 times in a row?
It changes you.
It changes the way you think about forms.
It changes your belief in forms.
Something I used to do,
I was practicing Tai Chi,
and I decided to pile stance it.
There are about 108 moves
in the classical form,
I took a full minute to do each move.
Took me two hours to do one form.
But,
Lord,
I was different after that.
My Tai Chi was different,
and I started to really understand
what the old Tai Chi masters were talking about.

Anyway,
I hope this gives you an idea on how to think outside the box.
The only advantage you’ve got is your imagination,
imagination IS thinking outside the box,
so put in a little extra sweat,
and put yourself outside the box.

And,
obligatory ad,
The book,
Chiang Nan,
is definitely outside the box.
I combined Karate and Tai Chi,
and got some interesting results,
results not covered by the fellows spouting their physics.
Here’s the link.

https://www.amazon.com/Chiang-Nan-Al-Case/dp/198767765X

Have a great work out!

Al

Here’s a link for an article about when I first started doing this book on Kenjutsu.
I intended to finish it quickly, but it’s actually been five years!

https://alcase.wordpress.com/2013/12/02/new-book-about-the-samurai-sword-is-coming/

Old Martial Arts Masters Knew More than One Art…

Newsletter 926

The Last Word on Chiang Nan

Got an email from Tom J the other week,
said an interesting thing.

I am getting the picture that “real” true karate, being true to its Okinawan roots, comes very close to stand-up grappling with strikes, I think, also, much of the sensitivity developed in Tai Chi – like exercises was there.

Even though they were not doing Tai Chi as such, lots of practice and thinking through the moves probably brought the Okinawan masters into that level of skill

Which brings me back to your “Everything must be practiced”, admonition. All the pieces are like pieces of a pie and all should be visited in practice.

Thanks Tom.
And he is so right.
People think that Tai Chi is the ultimate,
and it is,
but that doesn’t mean there aren’t others that are the ‘ultimate,’
it doesn’t mean that there aren’t other arts
that don’t elevate the student to the top.

My instructor said to me once:

There are many roads to the top of a mountain.

He had certainly reached the ability,
let alone the sage wisdom,
of a tai chi master.

The problem is that so many people think it is all about fighting.
Fighting is important,
but you go past fighting,
and start to understand how to handle life,
and what person can fight you
if you know how to handle life?
Heck,
a guy throws a punch
and it is an exercise in dissection,
in quick and sure manipulation,
and there is no fight.

And the truth of the matter is that these old guuyts,
these old masters,
who knew so much,
they knew so much because they studied more than just half an art.
Shake Morihei’s tree and you’ll find
the very thorough and complete
aikido jujitsu.
And you’ll find spear fighting,
sword fighting,
and all many of no nonsense studies.
Take a look at the Tai Chi masters,
you’ll find Shaolin,
types of kung fu,
history as bodyguards,
and it’s all to the death.

So don’t think you are going to be a master
if you study just one art.
Oh,
maybe,
but it’ll take half a century,
and then you die.

All of which means you should study ‘Chiang Nan,’

http://monstermartialarts.com/how-to-translate-karate-into-tai-chi-chuan/

Which takes karate and applies tai chi principles to it.
You get a soft way of train a hard art.
You figure out different ways,
sometimes more efficient ways,
to move the body.
You undo the effects of training that has been too hard,
and has resulted in injuries.
You elongate your life in the martial arts.
You learn more than you ever thought there was in the martial arts.

Okay,
enough preaching.
You heard or you didn’t,
and the choice is up to you.

I think,
next time,
I’ll talk about the various courses.
I’ve got so many,
got so many books,
I should probably differentiate them,
maybe acquaint some of the newbies to this newsletter
about the how and the why of matrixing your martial arts.
Until then,
think about Chiang Nan,

And have a great work out!
Al

http://monstermartialarts.com/how-to-translate-karate-into-tai-chi-chuan/

http://monstermartialarts.com

Release of How to Translate Karate into Tai Chi Chuan!

Newsletter 924

About the New Karate to Tai Chi Book!

Hi Guys and Gals.

This is to announce the official release of
‘Chiang Nan’

Chiang Nan is the title I settled on, the working title is
‘How to Translate Karate into Tai Chi Chuan.’
So Chiang Nan,
or ‘How to Translate Karate into Tai Chi Chuan
was originally bundled into the course.
You can get it in PDF if you order the course.

I just published the official book
‘How to Translate Karate into Tai Chi Chuan,’
and it is available on Amazon.
The official title is…

‘Chiang Nan’

and here’s the link…

https://www.amazon.com/Chiang-Nan-Al-Case/dp/198767765X/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1523645901&sr=8-1&keywords=chiang+nan

And for those who don’t know what it is about…
As the subtitle says,
it teaches one how to make karate into tai chi chuan.

If you have been studying karate,
this will expand your concepts of karate by ten times.
Different way of looking at form applications.
Different way of doing the form.
Really opens the mind.

If you have been studying Tai Chi Chuan,
you will learn a lot about techniques,
doing other arts tai chi style,
and so on.

Look,
it’s a different kind of strength,
different energy,
a whole and complete education.
If you know just the hard arts,
you need to know the soft.
or you only have half an art.

If you know just the soft arts,
you need to know the hard,
or you only have half an art.

This is a 270 page book
(three in one, actually)
that covers how to translate karate into tai chi,
what the lost form,
the original form that karate came from,
might look,
and the secret techniques of karate…
deliberately hidden by the secret pact
made by Okinawan karate masters.

So check it out on Amazon,
or just get the PDF by ordering the course through
MonsterMartialArts.com.

Have a great work out!
Al

https://www.amazon.com/Chiang-Nan-Al-Case/dp/198767765X/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1523645901&sr=8-1&keywords=chiang+nan

http://monstermartialarts.com

A Master Instructor from Greece!

Newsletter 923

One More Master Instructor

Well done and congrats to the latest Master Instructor!

Emmanouil Spanoudakis

Hello Mr. Al

I don’t know from where to begin with. I read the course and I have watched the videos. They changed most things I had in my mind about martial arts. Generally I practice on combat systems. So, I figured that most of combat systems just get the surface of  martial arts. I already applied some things, mostly on my stances and I show great improvements which need practice to be established. I thought all attacks and defenses I know and found out many mistakes. I’ m thinking correcting all my curriculum from the begging.

I liked your approach of the idea of energy because I have studied philosophy and metaphysics, but your approach made it more practical in my mind.

My win is that I show a depth in martial arts that I was feeling but couldn’t see. It is like you show that to me and I am very grateful about this. Now I have much material to work on in order to adjust on my martial arts.

About life I have the same approach with you considering martial arts. “Well, Art is beauty. It is harmony. It is when the elements of the universe are arranged in a pleasing pattern. Thus, the dawn can be great art. And, the greatest artist is merely that individual who can arrange the greatest (most significant) number of elements in the most beautiful pattern.” The idea is that I want to put this in a combat system.

I will keep practicing what I learned, thank you very much.

Emmanouil Spanoudakis.

Well done Emman,

and thank you.

And,

for the information of all,

Emman is from Greece and plans to open a school soon.

Armed with the right data,

Emman is going to be a success.

You can just feel it.

What I am particular struck with,

in his win,

is his last paragraph about beauty and harmony

and arranging the most elements in a beautiful pattern.

The purpose of the Master instructor course

is to give people enough information so that they can do this,

take all their data and rework it into a logic and profound pattern,

to break out of old patterns and make everything work

by giving enough information so they can do this.

Again.

well done, Emman,

and here’s the link…

http://monstermartialarts.com/martial-arts/4-master-instructor-course/

Have a great work out!

Al

http://monstermartialarts.com/martial-arts/4-master-instructor-course/

http://monstermartialarts.com

Reading Minds the Easy Way in the Martial Arts

Newsletter 920
<h1>Super Advanced Secret Martial Arts!</h1>
One of the things I really like
is when somebody understands what I’m talking about.
Hey, who doesn’t, right?

Some fellow writes and says:
‘I see it, the martial arts are all the same!
Karate, Pa Kua, Aikido, there’s no difference!’

And,
within a fortnight,
this same fellow will be chuckling with glee,
looking at somebody doing an art,
and understanding what that fellow is doing.
He sees a move,
and the whole picture opens up for him.
‘Oh, that guy is doing Kenpo.
Here is the karate variation.
Here is the Tai Chi variation.
And so on.

Once somebody understands that all arts are one,
the door opens.
He learns just by looking.
If he has done his basic work in some art,
say a couple of years getting his basics down,
it is easy as pie
to shift those basics,
and understand entire arts at a glance.

I remember the first time I verbalized this.
I was walking through an outdoor mall with one of my students,
we were passing out fliers.
My student saw a fellow coming towards us.
‘Here’s somebody,’ he said.
I glanced at the guy,
and without thinking, I said,
‘Studies Kenpo.’
My student stared at me.
“Well, he does.”
More stare.
“Ask him.”
So we stopped the fellow and I said,
‘Hey, you study Kenpo, right?’
The guy grinned and nodded.
He had just gotten his brown belt the night before.

But my student couldn’t believe it.
“That was luck!”

Two guys were walking towards us.
“The guy on the right does kenpo, too.
The guy on the left is Taekwondo.”

So we stopped them,
and I was right again.

Now my student was freaked.
“How are you doing that?”

“Well,
it’s sort of the way they walk,
each art walks differently,
but the real key is just a sort of attitude around them.”

I had about 30 years experience at the time,
I was hot and heavy into figuring matrixing out,
and knowing what people studied didn’t impress me.
I wasn’t impressed with myself,
It was just something I could do.
No biggie.

I had practiced the basics,
you see,
and the basics from a large enough variety of martial arts,
that I knew that all arts were one.
And I could see the flavor,
or the slant of a basic,
and I could see the flavor or slant
seeping into the way people walked,
how they talked and moved.
Actually,
it was sort of second realization for me.
The first was just realizing that people were uncoordinated,
walked all wrong,
didn’t understand the physics
of how their joints worked,
how their muscles moved,
of how to move the body without muscles.

The funny thing is,
there’s a few of you out there thinking I’m wacky.
But there’s more of you out there,
who have studied some matrixing,
read the Master Instructor book,
done the course,
that you know exactly what I’m talking about.
Heck,
you guys are my proof.

And,
to tell the truth,
anybody who has done the real martial arts,
not the domination and bully stuff,
but the patient, mind cooling stuff,
can do what what I’ve described here.

The question here is why take thirty or forty years to get there,
you could take a few matrixing courses
realize that all arts are one,
and have this ability in a year or two.

You could get started on any of the courses,
but I like the Master Instructor course,
cause it goes into the right way to use the body,
right away.

http://monstermartialarts.com/martial-arts/4-master-instructor-course/

Have a great work out!
Al

http://monstermartialarts.com/martial-arts/4-master-instructor-course/

http://monstermartialarts.com